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Peach Galette

Peach Galette ~ bonjourHan

Ah, peach season. Warm, juicy, ripe fruit dripping with the sweet nectar of summer in Texas.

Unfortunately, it’s January, and while winter grapefruit is delicious, it does not belong in a galette. I have also never successfully convinced Stephen that grapefruit is useful for more than just making the sink garbage disposal smell nice. Peaches are LONG gone, but I saw this picture in some old iPhone photos and thought I would post the recipe, since (A) It’s one of our favorite go-to desserts, and (B) I wanted a galette. I still don’t have a galette, but at least now everyone else can know what I’m missing out on right now.

Galettes…

“Any old pie crust” will not do. The crust is a crucial part of this dessert, partly because it needs to hold up structurally, but mainly because there’s not enough filling to “mask” over it. You will definitely taste it, so it needs to be good.

Side note: Why even have a pie crust if it’s only going to be bland and possibly gross? Why not just have a bowl of pumpkin or baked apple filling and save everyone the trouble? A pie crust should be good. It should actually add to the flavor of the pie, not detract from it or have no taste. Even a simple crust with just a few ingredients can be delicious if it’s the right one for the pie. (If you have any more questions on My Food Philosophy 101, please see me after class.) But seriously. Crust. Don’t waste the carbs if it’s not good, man.

Ingredients

I adapted this crust from a galette crust recipe in “Cast Iron Cooking,” by Dwayne Ridgaway.

For the crust:

  • 1 1/4 cups flour
  • 1 Tbs sugar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 7 Tbs cold butter, cut into pieces (If you can’t do dairy, then shortening is fine, but if you can, please use real butter!)
  • 3 Tbs ice water
  • Optional: 1/2 Tbs milk to brush over the prepared crust

For the filling:

  • 2 ripe peaches (ideally they will be soft and juicy, but not mushy)
  • 1-2 Tbs brown sugar (depending on how sweet your peaches are. Yes, I advocate taste-testing your peaches as you slice them. For safety purposes. And research. And posterity. And stuff. Basically, you need to end up with approximately two sliced peaches. If you started out with three, it’s none of my beeswax.)
  • 2 dashes cinnamon
  • 1 tiny dash nutmeg
  • Optional: 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

I actually don’t have a “recipe” for the filling and never measure, so this is just a guess on how much of everything to use. It should also tell you that this is a flexible recipe. Use whatever you have, and play around with it if you want. I would say the peaches and the sugar are the only required filling ingredients. And if “sugar” looks like honey  or maple syrup to you, I say go for it (though keep in mind the filling will probably be more likely to ooze out of the galette with the liquid sweeteners).

Directions

Preheat the oven to 400° F.

If you have a food processor:

  • Use plastic dough blades if you have them.
  • Toss in all the crust ingredients and pulse until it forms a ball.

If you don’t have a food processor:

  • Mix the flour, sugar and salt in a bowl. Using a fork or a pastry cutter, “cut in” the butter until it looks like large crumbs. Basically, this means mashing the butter until it becomes a million tiny pieces and is evenly distributed in the flour.
  • Add the ice water and mix with a fork until it forms a ball.
  1. Roll out the dough into a big circle (maybe 8-10 inches) on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. The baking sheet must have edges, because the galette will likely leak a bit, and you do not want to chisel a hardened layer of burned fruit syrup off the bottom of your oven.
  2. Slice the peaches thinly and toss into a bowl with the remaining ingredients. It should not be as wet or gooey as a typical pie filling.
  3. Dump the filling into the center of the circle and fold up the edges toward the center, leaving a large “hole” (see the top photo on the left).
  4. Brush the milk over the folded crust for a simple glaze.
  5. Bake for 40 minutes. Let it cool for five minutes after removing it from the oven, then slice it into fourths like a pie. It serves four. Or, let’s be honest, two…

We also love apple galettes and berry galettes, depending on the season.

  • For apple, thinly slice an apple (or two, depending on the size) and mix with some brown sugar, cinnamon and a dash of ground nutmeg or cloves.
  • For berry, mix with some white sugar and about 1/2 teaspoon of lemon juice. Berries are very juicy, so I would avoid using more than 1 cup of berries for the filling.

No bake cookies ~ bonjourHan.comIt’s time.

I have made these cookies 6 or 7 times over the past few months, but I kept forgetting to take a picture of them so I could post the recipe. However, today is your lucky day, as I actually remembered to write the blog post and have a batch of No-Bake Cookies in the fridge AT THE SAME TIME.

These actually have a lot of ingredients that are good for you, so while each cookie is about 126 calories, a good portion of it is healthy calories your body can actually use. (I don’t know about you, but to me, it’s a perfect excuse to eat more.)

Stephen doesn’t really like coconut, but he loves these cookies. I can’t get enough of them either. They come together in just a few minutes, and they will set in the fridge in about 30 minutes.

They are both dairy-free and gluten-free (if you use gluten-free oats), and they use no refined sugar.

Ingredients

With the exception of dark/baker’s chocolate, I typically have all of the ingredients on hand, so I can whip up a batch if I need something quick.

  • 2/3 cup real maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup coconut oil ( have a big container of extra-virgin coconut oil that I use for everything from cooking to moisturizing my face. I love the stuff.)
  • 4 oz unsweetened baker’s chocolate (or 1/2 bar dark chocolate)
  • 2-3 Tbs cocoa powder
  • 1/2 cup peanut butter (I usually use creamy, but I’ve made it with crunchy before too, and it gives it some extra crunch.)
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1 cup quick oats (I have also successfully used gluten-free regular oats.)

I’ve been wanting to try it with almond butter sometime instead of peanut butter; I think it would be delicious! If you try it before I do, let me know how it tastes!

Directions

These are easy, and they use very few dishes (yes, sadly, that is often a factor in deciding what to cook. My 15-month-old is not quite ready to be my personal dishwashing assistant.)

  1. Combine maple syrup, coconut oil, chocolate and cocoa powder over medium heat. I usually measure out my other ingredients and leave them in their measuring cups while it heats up. When it boils, stir constantly for 3 minutes, then remove from heat.
  2. Stir in the peanut butter, vanilla and oats until smooth.
  3. Line a cookie sheet with wax paper. Use a measuring cup to scoop out the mixture and pour 16 dollops on the cookie sheet. Lick the spoon. Place in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes to harden.

I store mine in the refrigerator, because I think they taste best chilled, and because coconut oil melts at such a low temperature that I don’t want them to have to stand up to Texas heat.

This is an original recipe.

126 calories/cookie, if you’re counting

Baby Lightning Cookie ~ bonjourHan.com

Baby Lightning eating cookie ~ bonjourHan.com

Creamy spinach pasta

avocado pasta

This creamy, flavorful pasta sauce is actually healthy. And I don’t mean “not quite as terrible for you as cheesy alfredo drenched in butter so we can call it healthy.” I mean it is actually healthy. And the creaminess comes from…

wait for it…

Avocado.

Avocado may not sound like it belongs in your pasta, and I was just as skeptical as you probably are right now. Well, maybe a little less skeptical. I’ve been known to enjoy some pretty random cuisine. But it really doesn’t taste like avocado.

I adapted the recipe from the Pink Parsley blog, who adapted it from the Perry’s Plate blog. I like to add a little extra zip of flavor.

Ingredients

Notice how healthy this ingredient list is! It’s the perfect excuse to load up on carb-heavy pasta.

  • 12 oz. pasta (I prefer whole wheat thin spaghetti)
  • 2 Tbs butter
  • 2-3 Tbs white wine (I use a $3 chardonnay from Walmart because I’m so cultured.)
  • 1/4 – 1/2 of an onion, chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced (I cannot live without my garlic press.)
  • 12 oz. fresh spinach (I’ve used thawed frozen spinach in a pinch. I’ve also used half spinach and half zucchini with great results.)
  • 1/4 cup Greek yogurt
  • 1 avocado, chopped
  • 1-2 tsp dried basil (The original recipe calls for fresh basil, and I LOVE fresh basil, so I’m sure that tastes amazing. I, however, did not grow basil this year, so I am stuck with dried basil.)
  • 1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese
  • 2 dashes of cayenne pepper
  • Pinch of salt and pepper

The cayenne pepper doesn’t make it spicy. It just adds flavor. Don’t skip it!

Directions

It’s actually pretty quick. And I don’t mean, “if you spent three hours chopping all your vegetables beforehand”-quick.

  1. Cook the pasta. You can make the sauce while it is boiling. Whenever the pasta is done, save about 1/2 cup of the pasta water for the sauce, and drain the rest.
  2. Sauté the onion with the butter and white wine over medium heat in a large skillet until soft, about 5 minutes. Add the minced garlic and cook until the garlic starts smelling really delicious. Do not wait until the garlic starts turning brown. (Though if you do, it will still taste great. It’s just not ideal.)
  3. Add the fresh spinach to the pan and cover the lid for a minute or two. Then stir the spinach around to coat it in all the lovely juices and replace the lid for a few more minutes until the spinach has wilted.
  4. Transfer the spinach onion mixture to a blender or food processor. Add the yogurt, avocado, basil, cayenne and a few tablespoons of the reserved pasta water. Purée the mixture until smooth. Add the parmesan cheese, salt and pepper and pulse a few more times until blended.
  5. Toss the sauce with the drained pasta. It seems like a lot, but I use all the sauce at once. It is so flavorful and wonderful, and it’s not runny like regular pasta sauce.

When I make this pasta, I don’t bother making a vegetable dish on the side. I feel like I’m being OH, SO BAD, but with all the spinach, onion, garlic and avocado involved, you don’t even need it.

spinach avocado pesto

Hello…?

…Anybody home? *cricket*

I realize it’s been a while since I’ve updated the blog. I miss sharing recipes with my faithful followers (Hi, Mom). If you’ll notice, my last post was in December. Coincidentally, that’s around the same time that this guy started crawling. Things got a little busier around here once he was mobile, especially since he started crawling, pulling up and “cruising” all on the same day. Here is a picture from December:

baby standing

And now he is a 14-month-old extrovert who will eat anything (and a lot of it) and loves being in a crowd and interacting with everyone (I wonder where he got that…).

baby outdoors

(The above picture was taken at my parents’ house, where he gets to borrow Papa’s hat, play with the “puh PEE!” and carry around all manner of rocks and branches.)

Anyway, all that to say… I have a recipe all typed up and ready to publish tomorrow. And hopefully many more after that. Is there anything you would like to see on the blog?

Basic cheese sauce

Velvety cheese sauce - bonjourHan

This velvety cheese sauce tastes so good, and it’s really quick to whip up. It can take a vegetable dish from boring to amazing in just a few minutes. And if you’re a good cheese-drizzler, your previously boring vegetables can even look elegant. When I went off to college, my mom made sure this essential sauce recipe went with me.

If you tell me my cheese sauce looks like “Easy Cheese,” you will suffer the wrath of a thousand scornful looks. I do not allow fake cheese into my house. I’ve made one recipe ever that called for Cheez Whiz, and I seriously could not buy the stuff. I made Cheez Whiz from scratch, y’all. “Processed cheese food” makes me cringe. (Seriously – go look at the Wikipedia page. It’s like reading about a frightening science experiment gone wrong.)

On that appetizing note, let’s move on to this yummy, real cheese sauce that actually is not remotely similar to processed cheese food! This versatile sauce recipe can also be transformed into a basic white sauce or even broccoli cheese soup.

Ingredients

It really could not be simpler. Unless you actually entertained the thought of comparing it with Cheez Whiz, in which case you would just open a jar. And be sorely disappointed.

  • 2 Tbs butter
  • 2 Tbs flour
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 cup shredded cheese (I love extra-sharp cheddar)
  • Optional: A sprinkle of nutmeg or cayenne

You can use whatever cheese you want, and you can grate it yourself or buy it pre-shredded. It’s very versatile! This recipe is like a blank slate for whatever kind of cheese you want to use.

Directions

Watch it carefully, because milk can go from nothing to BOILINGOVERBIGMESS in 0.3 seconds.

  1. Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat.
  2. Stir the flour quickly into the melted butter. It helps to use a whisk or fork.
  3. Add the milk all at once and stir until thickened.
  4. Add the cheese and stir until melted.

It’s best when served immediately, though it does keep for a few days in the refrigerator.

VARIATIONS

White sauce: This sauce is elegant and tasty over anything from vegetables to eggs and toast. It’s the same recipe, simply leave out the shredded cheese.

Broccoli cheese soup: Add more milk and some chopped broccoli. Maybe toss in some black pepper and some parsley just for kicks. Done!

Basic Cheese Sauce - bonjourHan

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